Ferrari Insists On Continuing To Make Gas Cars, Says It Is 'Arrogant' To Do Otherwise

Ferrari has made it clear that it has no intention of beginning to transition away from combustion engines and over to electric or hybrid engines anytime soon, promising on Sunday to continue making their gas cars until at least the end of the 2030s. 

According to the BBC, the boss of the company believes it would be “arrogant” for the company to begin dictating what products their customers can and can’t purchase. "It is the client who must choose if they want an ICE (internal combustion engine), a hybrid, or an electric car," the Ferrari boss added. 

The company is still intending to release electric vehicles, with its first fully electric car planned to be released in 2025. Ferrari has admitted the development of electric cars has presented them with a unique challenge as a manufacturer, but has stated their first EV will provide a “unique driving experience.”

Ferrari has stated they intend to go to a three-pronged approach in developing and manufacturing cars, moving toward more development of electrical and hybrid vehicles, though ensuring to maintain that third prong of combustion engines. 


The company has called the combustion engines “an essential part of the company’s heritage,” highlighting the importance of that third prong. 

Ferrari first produced racing cars way back in 1947, crafting the Ferrari 125 S, a 1.5 L V12 engine car, according to the official Ferrari website.

Ferrari has faced notable pressure from the European Union to transition to electric vehicles, with the organization passing a law requiring all new cars to be carbon-neutral by the year 2035, per the BBC. The EU has clarified that they will provide exemptions for cars that run exclusively on synthetic ‘e-fuels,’ which are produced using renewable energy. 

The major downside of the ‘e-fuels’ is its expensive costs as well as its currently limited production, not being able to provide nearly enough for the entire market. However, the loophole still provides top combustion engines like Ferrari to continue to produce their vehicles. 

It’s hard for a company that’s been producing combustion engine vehicles for nearly eighty years to suddenly hop on over to the new trend of electric vehicles, so it seems like the smartest approach for the legendary company is to take its proper time transitioning. 

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